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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
katrinas, .72% of a degree. that that's nothing. and that's why science actives working so hard at this. also, this global warming study category four and five hurricanes in all ocean basins have increased at a rate of about 25% to 30%. this is no joke, this is science. let's bring in a science nick maloshus as stanford, thanks for being on "the young turks" today. >> thanks for having me. michael: tell us what kind of big news pete is. how innovative and exciting is this for people really worried about this issue? >> i think it's a really interesting technique in that it adds to the efficiency of systems already in place. if you think about these large power towers where you take reflective mirrors and focus it on to a central tower to create steam, this increases the efficiency so it becomes economically viable. michael: explain what we are looking at here. we are looking at pete. explain what's going on, that sort of yellow gray thing at the top and take us through how it works. >> yeah, so this is a simplified diagram of how the physical process would actually work. we have two para
best with their married mother and father. >> that is not true. >> it is. all the social science evidence. >> you're saying it's a utopia. >> no, i'm knot. i'm looking at the evidence. john, go ahead. >> i think it's not fundamentally about that counterpoint and what social science says or doesn't say. i think it's about listening to people across america and speaking with people who are in same-sex relationships or who identify as lgbt. if you listen to them with an empathetic ear, you can hear where they're coming from, that we basically have two legal systems set up, one for gay and lesbian people and one for the rest of the country. i think it's more about just sort of taking an honest and open approach to listening to these people and hearing what they have to say and where they're coming from. and that's what i try to do with my reporting. >> it's also important to come on to tell the truth and not spread rumors and infactual information. >> what did i say that was incorrect? >> because -- forget it. what you're saying is that it's not illegal, and it is illegal. that's the
to life? scientists work to revive extinct animals. this isn't science fiction, it's real. >>> i'm brianna keilar. >> and i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the obama is standing with israel in a dangerous time in the region. >> his most urgent warning in syria, vowing that the assad regime will be held accountable if it has in fact used chemical weapons as the rebels claim. >> plet's go to jerusalem first with jessica. a very powerful meeting today. very interesting between the president and the prime minister. >> wolf, that's right. president obama here in jerusalem for the first overseas trip of his second term. a visit which in symbolism already president obama is emphasizing the u.s.'s commitment to ensuring israel's security and correcting any past sleights, real or perceived. president obama and prime minister netanyahu together in israel. they were acting like long-lost friends, joking, getting casual, complimenting each other's children while taking a little dig. >> they are very good looking young men who clearly got their
kids' education, science and research. they also cut medicaid which affects a lot of those seniors on medicare, about 20% of those seniors are also on medicaid. but it's at the end of that 10-year window that our republican colleagues then move to their voucher plan, premium support, i don't care what you call it. the only way you're going to achieve any savings compared to the baseline numbers, c.b.o. baseline that the chairman showed you, the only way you're going to do it is if you're capping the amount you're going to get so that seniors have to eat the costs and take the risks of rising health care. now, there's a better way to address that issue and that is the way we approach it in our budget and that is to build on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, in obamacare, which have helped and contributed to reducing the rapid rise in per capita health care costs and which as i pointed out earlier our republican colleagues included in their own budget. so, yes, we have to deal with these drivers of costs, including health care. but the way we propose to do
editor dr. richard besser is here to tell us more. i know there's a lot of complicated science but can you break it down and explain how it works. >> this is pretty incredible. using a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. take a look at this animation. they had five patients with untreatable cancer. they used a virus to inject genetic material into a patient's own white cells to turn them into cancer fighters. those then went out in the body and destroyed all the cancer cells. these patients, they all went into remission. three of them had bone marrow transplants and are doing great. >> we didn't realize one of the patients, our own david aponte, our sound man, we spent time with him and it's incredible. >> yeah, i spoke with david the other day, and, you know, he credits this with saving his life. last summer he had had lots of chemotherapy. he thought he was in remission and his cancer bounced back. there was nothing left for him to do. he had this treatment. they injected the cells. overwhelming reaction in his body, eight days later not one cancer cell could be found. he ha
education, job training, health care and advanced science and research. even with these investments, our budget is projected to reduce the deficit by approximately $2.8 trillion over the decade compared to the c.b.o.'s baseline which incidentally does not include the savings that we will achieve through the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. that will put us on a sustainable goal and more than meets the the goal. so we feel that is a responsible goal. now this number is pessimistic, because with the jobs bill, we think we are going to do a lot better because of the similar effect it has on the economy. this is in stark contrast to the committee report, which has vague numbers, numbers that don't add up or don't give you a clue as to where they're going to get the money. the budget has a reduction in tax rates. does not say how you are going to make that revenue neutral, where you are going to assign the $5 trillion in taxes to make it revenue neutral. they block grant medicaid. by the time the end of 10 years, it's one-third of where it needs to be to maintain benefits. 2/
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ it was the best day ♪ ♪ it was the best day yeah! ♪ it was the best day ♪ because of you [sigh] [echoing] we make a great pair. huh? progressive and the great outdoors -- we make a great pair. right, totally, uh... that's what i was thinking. covering the things that make the outdoors great. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> infrastructure is one of the best things we can do to boost the economy. it creates short-term jobs. over the long-term, better roads, railways, ports, electrical grids, broadband. they invite businesses to operate more efficiently. they save them money, they create jobs. if you're a regular viewer of this show, you probably saw me go underground in new york city last summer to get a closeup look at one of the biggest public works projects in american history. i'm talking about manhattan's second avenue subway line. completing it will cost around $22 billion. what's behind the mammoth tab? here's what i found out when i traveled underground. >> reporter: backhoe exka varieties, man lift
in political science from the university of massachusetts. the doctor's degree is from dartmouth college. doctor, you are invited to take the podium. [applause] >> thank you. i first want to thank the senator for making progress and including me in this important work that they are doing and making that link between looking at lgbt health and hiv and a portal to act. we started off with president obama giving a historic speech speech in 2011 at ending the aids epidemic at some point in our lifetime. this was quite a moment. the moment of opportunity and optimism that i want to start with. the reason the president obama made that statement is because we have a combination that together is something that could turn the tide on epidemics. we also have a national strategy that the white house about a couple of years ago and provides a roadmap. more than a million people are living with hiv in the united states. for the last decade, they have been at the same level and perhaps more alarmingly, you and infections are rising by those who represent 66% of their infections in the united states.
year appropriations bills to h.r. 33. the ones for homeland security, commerce, just t. and science, and agriculture. mr. speaker, these were the bills that passed the house by large margins with bipartisan backing. and are now by the senate reinserted into the c.r. for the balance of the year. and it pleases this member and this chairman that those bills were picked up and certified into the c.r. that we are passing today. this funding will support critical law enforcement agencies, protect our nation's borders and food supplies, and provide important agriculture and rural development investments. we have ensured that critical government services like food and nutrition assistance programs remain available to those who need them most. these updated spending and funding levels will help keep our economy on the path toward recovery, supporting u.s. trade manufacturing, and job creation. in the other departments and agencies covered by the bill, both the house and senate made limited technical changes where absolutely necessary to prevent extensive waste of taxpayer dollars and to avo
a new science-based economy like in europe. they very well cannot stand by --n -- stand by it cannot stand by when a massacre as called out by the syrian president against his own people, his own children. an arsenal of chemical warheads. wasnuclear installation destroyed. arsenal remains in his hands to this very day. danger for thee syrian people, for the entire region. we have to prevent the chemical weapons from falling into their own hands. the best option to put an end it to the syrian tragedy might be achieved by empowering the arab league of which syria is a member, to intervene. and an intervention of the would succeed as a foreign intervention. should form a provisional government in syria to stop the massacre, to prevent syria from falling to pieces. the united nations should support the arab league to build an arab force in blue helmets. friends, 18 years ago i came to sign the association of agreement between the european union and israel. reality hashat surpassed expectations. partnership, and before long, the partnership became a french ship. it is on this day that i p
economy through education, job training, health care, and science and resedge. i yield myself an additional 30 seconds. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. scott: even with these additional investments, this is needed to put our economy back on a sustainable path because it's more than the simpson-bowles deficit reduction 10-year goal. the c.b.c. budget shows we can create jobs, invest in education, transportation, and research and avoid devastating health care cuts and achieve the 10-year simpson-bowles deficit reduction goal and i urge my colleagues to support the congressional black caucus budget. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia rise? >> i claim the time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. broun: i want to comment my -- commend my friend mr. scott for bringing forward a budget on behalf of the congressional black caucus. i think it's important we have all sorts of options here on the floor to be able to discuss, i would note a couple of items that he conveniently left out, one is th
tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. we talked about the 47% of americans who haven't taken advantage of the stock market rally. what about the rest of us? this month the dow has been shattering records. sure american companies are doing well and the economy is starting to look up, but there's no denying this it rally is in large part fuelled by the fed, which has kept interest rates so low you can't make money anywhere other than the housing and stock markets. the stock market is lot more liquid than housing. to help prop up the down economy, the fed has been pumping money into the system every month in exchange for bonds. that increases the money supply. it drives down interest rates. for awhile now, the fed funds rate, which is the benchmark for loans americans use to raise money, has been at near zero. the hope is that banks and other lenders will use this cash to lend to consumers and businesses. borrowers will take advantage of the lower interest rates to buy homes and perch cars and start new
nutrition assistance because of sequester. national science grants cut, is,000 of them. 902 million cut from loans to our small businesses who are the job creators. and even 1 240*u f.b.i,000 f.b.d other law enforcement personnel. so, yes, i say to my friend who is not here -- who is leading the filibuster, the senator from kansas -- i hope he comes and shows up -- i hear him. i feel the pain he feels. i feel the pain he feels for a his state. i have a list that i won't bore you with that shows the cuts to my state. it is painful. but how do you solve it? not by amendment after amendment after amendment on a must-pass bill that the house has said, keep it simple or the government shuts down. not that way. but by turning to the democratic budget. where senator murray and the colleagues there have restored those cuts and they won't other ways to cut, better ways to cut, sensible ways to cut. so i call on my friends on the other side of the aisle, if you want to waste 10 hours, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 hours, it is your call. we will be here. but we are not going to put off the passage of the
believe in science and in evidence, and i do not think there is any scientific evidence that says that we should have such a public policy that tries to do what you have described that bill is doing in new jersey. i do not know the exact bill, but clyde conversion -- >> conversion therapy. >> i do not know what the evidence is, but i know it is disrespectful, and discriminatory, and therefore, i would oppose the conversion therapy and support the bill as we have in california. again, i have not seen that particular bill. s in the bill says there is a ban on conversion therapy. what is the point? what is the point? what is the point? i think it is stale. i think under people understand we talk about respect for all of god's children, not wanting to be discriminatory in any respect, that that really has the place, and it certainly does not. would that be in the schools? are they doing it in the schools are taking people side -- >> i am not sure, but i was wondering more broadly what you think, because these are being proposed. >> what is their purpose? we have been through this. when i came
're on the brink of incredible breakthroughs in neurological science that could help either find the cure for alzheimer's or do the cognitive stretchout. we've got to spend money to save money. let's put the money into research, let's deal with alzheimer's, parkinson's, lou gehrig's disease, the things that break the family budget, break the family's heart, and also contribute to our public debt. but we can get there if we make wise and prudent choices. most of the people in nursing homes are really primarily women over the age of 80. and what are we going to do? are we going to abandon them? so, mada mr. president, this but is unkind to women. but its also unkind -- and children -- in terms of the opportunity structure. the ryan budget caps and freezes pell grants at $5,645. it requires frame families thate less than $25,000 to qualify for a pell grant. that means that if you're -- many people who seek pell grants are single mothers, and there's recent data out that shows so many of our families now -- 63% -- are in single-parent house holes and it can be a single mother or single dad bu
will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs and even air-conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. school officials say it was based on low enrollments, but others say race played a role. an alderman told the "chicago tribune," every time the whites get to scheming and hollering, they back off and steam roll. not this time. she's
concerned about inflation is actually got a couple points from a month ago. people see some bad science, see some good signs, and they are really concerned about what is coming. stuart: are you better off now? you asked that question. what did people tell you? >> be asked them if their situation now is getting better or worse. 39% say worse. these numbers are not great. they are better than what they were a couple of years ago. we asked people who are working about their employment situation. 22% say that their firms are hiring. 21% are saying that their firms are laying off. we may be heading to another disappointing second third quarter. stuart: ouch. scott rasmussen, thank you very much. >> thank you, stuart. stuart: the agriculture department will continue its food stamp outreach program in mexico. here is my take. forty-nine years the u.s. virginia staffers have been holding meetings, conferences, health fairs in mexico trying to raise awareness for america's foodstamp programs. senate republicans wanted to trim the program. some democrats beat back the challenge. there will be no cuts
who got into this a couple years ago. i didn't really understand the science behind what we call the learning connection. and i think that's, you know, it's something i learned very closely from dr. david satcher who wrote a report about the learning connection about seven, eight years ago. >> 2005. >> 2005. and what it is, there's an impact on a child's ability to learn and the number one impact is that they're nourished and they're physically a lly active. it has an impact on their performance, behavior, attendance. all these issues we hear about each day. you wonder sometimes in this country why it is that we're 25th or 15th in science or math. all of these things add up. you have to have a healthy child in order to be a good academic performer. >> we're looking at a full screen. that's very interesting. if you look at picture on the left that is what t.j.'s brain scan looks like 24 hours a day. >> it's actually a preadolescent child. same thing. good point. >> to the right, obviously, after 20 minutes of walking, you see the brain much more stimulated. again, something that t
and the consideration by the court of proposition 8. i believe in science and i believe in evidence and i don't think there is any scientific evidence that says that we should have such a public policy that tries to do what you described that bill in doing in new jersey. i'm not familiar with that exact bill, but conversion -- >> conversion therapy. >> i don't know what the scientific evidence is to go down that path. i do know it's disrespectful and discriminatory and therefore i would oppose the conversion therapy and support the bill as we have in california. again i haven't seen that particular bill. i assume the bill says there is a ban on conversion therapy. what is the point? what is the point? i think it's stale. i think that younger people understand that we talk about respect for all, respect for all god's children, not want be to be discriminatory in any respect. that that really has no place and it certainly doesn't. will that be in the schools? is that what they are doing in the schools? taking people aside? >> i'm not sure. i just wonder more broadly what you think. more of these bills
is not rocket science in terms of identifying what the issues are. there are two issues here, mr. president. one of them is taxes, and the other is medicare. and the two of them, in fact, are inextricably linked in many respects because i've heard some on the other side of the aisle say i'll look at ways to reform taxes if colleagues on the democratic side will look at ways to protect medicare and at the same time hold down its cost. and we've heard other senators say the reverse. and so these issues are really inextricably linked. and one of the reasons that i support this budget this evening, mr. president, is that i think this budget provides significant space, significant space for democrats and republicans as this process goes forward to produce bipartisan solutions on those two issues, the tax question and the medicare issue in the days ahead. and let me take just a few minutes. senator coats talked about our bipartisan efforts. i've had a chance really for the last five years to work with two very thoughtful conservative republicans, senator coats and our former colleague, senator gregg,
affairs, and a masters degree in political science from the university of massachusetts. or bachelors degree is from dartmouth college. dr. kates, you -- your educated self, please take the podium. [applause] >> thank you. good morning, everyone. we have been at kaiser family foundation analyzing and tracking the affordable care act for many different perspectives and hiv has been a core part of what we do. so to begin i just want to start off with this, because this was president obama on world aids day in 2011 getting a pretty historic speech about the possibility of ending the aids epidemic at some point in our lifetime. and for those of us have been working in hiv for very long time this was quite a moment and it's a moment of opportunity and optimism that i want to start with. the reason president obama made that statement and those of us working in the field are hopeful is that we have a combination now of new scientific advances with existing interventions that together is scaled up could begin to turn the tide on the epidemic. we also have a national hiv strategy for the first
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> you're >> you're watching cnbc's "squawk on the street." we are watching the financial capital of the world where the opening bell is set to ring in 45 minutes and we are indicating to have an up day across the board on wall street. the question is will we see the laggards in yesterday's session recoup some of their losses. most notably the financials and a lot of the financials were quite weak on scares about cyprus. we're looking past it a little bit at this point. >> i think on a secondary reflection and remember on thursday there will be big bank lines and the bears will come rit baback and there's been a lot of refinancing and the banks and literally right now, citi, and bank of america doing a lot of refinancing and i do believe the commercial real estate is coming back. that's a real big play. i'd love to know how citi holdings is doing in this rising environment. >> there's a lot to like. i like citi here and there you have the openi
of health, the national science foundation, the national err naughtics and space administration, among others. as -- err naughtics and space ad-- arow naughtics and space -- a; eronautics and space administration as aamong others. you cannot turn on and off research like a faucet. under the majority's budget that valuable research will be ended and it's important -- and these important discoveries will probably not be made in the united states. the majority wants to impose such cuts on top of the cuts contained in the sequester, even though this effects of the sequester are just beginning to be felt. for example, in the coming weeks, airport control towers will begin to close affecting flight schedules and stranding travelers, and many of these towers are low cailted in the rural parts of our country where there are no other alterntives for long distance travel. in addition, border patrol agents will be furloughed, which not only affects security but the success of our economy. according to the congressional budget research service, more than $1.3 billion a day, each and every day, in
' education. those are our investments in science and research to help power our economy. those are our investments to help modernize our infrastructure. they cut transportation by 15% when we have 15% unemployment in the construction industry. so mr. chairman, the american people rejected the kind of uncompromising lopsided approach that we see once again presented here in the house. the same thing we've seen for the last three years as if we hadn't even had a debate last fall. now, in the democratic alternative, we focus on the main issue right now and in the future. we don't only want strong economic growth in the future, we want to see accelerated job growth right now. you know, we've seen some momentum in the jobs market in the last couple months. but the republican budget, it will put the brakes on that growth. now, the chairman of the budget committee can quote what economists all he wants and there are economists that say it will do this or won't do this or will do that, but we have an empire in the congress, we have a refugee. they are called the congressional budget office. th
budget also guts investments in science. job tructure and all the growth as well as the future of our children. if you don't believe it, talk to the doctors at n.i.h., the ones who worry whether they'll be able to complete the esearch they're doing. i was told a few years ago there were certain types of cancers that were deadly and now because of the research at n.i.h. they are chronic. i don't know how you put a price tag on somebody's life. this budget would reduce nondefense discretionary spending including core social services that middle class families rely on by an additional $700 billion over the next 10 years. below the senseless cuts already required under the sequester. and his plan, mr. ryan's plan, repeats past attacks on federal employees by cutting the work force by 10% over the next decade and requiring federal workers to contribute an additional $132 billion to their retirement plans. to justify these proposals, the majority continues to argue their policies and support austerity such as sequestration will solve our fiscal problems and magically create prosperity for a
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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